Time to #roost. #roosting #hammock (at Kinnickinnic River)

magictransistor:

Sebastian Adams, Synchronological Chart of Universal History (Details), Cartographies of Time, ca. 1881.

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

hareteeth:

ghostsmultiply:

ice-grave:

murmurfromtheruins:

whatwepretend:

"Don’t Tell Me To Smile: A No-Nonsense Guide to Street Harassment"

-A zine by Arlene Barrow (whatwepretend) and Annie Barrow (malheureuseandmaladroite)

Reblog the SHIT out of this.

ive been repeatedly harassed by a bunch of different people in seattle this week, but  according to this tasers are legal here

I know so many people who can benefit from this.

Do you really have to register your pepper spray in NY/C?

Pretty awesome zine on dealing with street harassment

midnight-charm:

"Giochi Di Luce" photographed by Christian Moser for Marie Claire Italia October 1991

(via cybrsect)

etsy:

Here’s a full spectrum of pretty things. Structure Minerals collected these specimens for you to have, hold and ogle.

(via cybrsect)

It’s Only a Paper Moonc. 1900s-1950s

(via rigidfingers)

archiemcphee:

World travelers Jürgen and Mike of For 91 Days recently visited an amazing temple in Setagaya, Tokyo. The Gōtoku-ji temple contains an awesome shrine dedicated to the Maneki-neko, or “Beckoning Cat”, a symbol of good luck and one of Japan’s most iconic images.

Setagaya is the setting of one of the Maneki-neko’s origin stories: It was there long ago that a wealthy feudal lord took shelter during a storm under a tree near Gōtoku-ji temple. “The lord saw the temple priest’s cat beckoning to him and followed; a moment later the tree was struck by lightning. The wealthy man became friends with the poor priest and the temple became prosperous. When the cat died, supposedly the first maneki-neko was made in his honor.”

"Worshipers at the Gotoku-ji often bring a Maneki Neko statue to leave for good luck. The result is a little surreal, with hundreds of cats sitting along a set of shelves outside a shrine. Except in size, they’re are all identical, exactly the same model with the same paw raised and the same beatific expression on their face.

The cat shrine is just one tiny section of the expansive Gotoku-ji temple, which, thanks to its location on the outskirts of the city, is usually very quiet.”

As you can see from these photos, there really are countless ceramic Maneki-neko figurines all over the place. To get an even better sense of just how densely populate the shrine is, check out Jürgen and Mike’s brief video panning across the grounds. There are also many more photos to be seen over at Tokyo For 91 Days.

[via Neatorama and Tokyo For 91 Days]

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

mentalflossr:

What’s on the Other Side of the Ocean? (Click for larger view)

I’ve wondered this before and traced along a globe.